Aging In Place Services Finds Niche in Local Market

Informational Seminar set for October 30th as part of the Quality Aging Series

Nashville, Tennessee – October 9, 2012 — For most of us, our home, no matter how humble, is our castle. So, as we age or if we become disabled, should we be forced to move?

Aging in place is a term that refers to making changes in the home to allow the owners to live there for as long as possible and therefore reduces the burden on family and
society alike.

“This stay-at-home approach requires planning to accommodate the physical, mental, and psychological changes that may accompany aging,” says Sara Beth Warne of Aging in Place Transition Services. It involves interior design to make living space more accessible for family members and friends. A little planning will allow you to enjoy your home for many, many more years.

“Most American housing was built with families as the model client. Considerations for accessibility and planning for lifestyles of aging adults and the potential need for inhome services or caregivers are rarely addressed in the average floor plan,” says Warne. “Planning early for remaining in a home or relocating to a more suitable home is a difficult and emotional experience. Most aging adults and children of aging parents wait too long for the changes necessary to age in place. The decision is often made quickly and with a looming deadline predicated by illness or a death. This often means a relocation rather than a plan to age in place,” she adds.

Warne, who started Aging in Place Transition Services over a year ago with partner Linda Bolton, has found a great demand for these services in Nashville and surrounding communities in Middle Tennessee and Northern Alabama.

“Our company offers a wide variety of services to assist homeowners in transitioning to meet their needs when seeking a more functional living environment,” explains Warne. Her company will sponsor a seminar on this topic as part of the “Quality Aging” program organized by St. George’s Episcopal Church and the Nashville Council on Aging. The presentation entitled, “Aging in Place” will take place on Tuesday morning, October 30 beginning at 9:30 a.m. at St. George’s Episcopal Church at 4717 Harding Road. The series is free and open to the general public. Aging in Place Transition Services will have a booth at the event with detailed information on their services and a representative will be there to answer questions.

“On average the costs of moving to an assisted living facility can run around $35,000 a year. We offer a more affordable solution,” states Warne. “A few thousand dollars in modifications can often resolve the problem and alleviate the emotional stress of moving out of a cherished home place.”

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